Manic Monday

Good morning. Welcome to another edition of Manic Monday.

First, the Bad News: Venice was flooded with water as high as five feet above the normal level. According to the Guardian,

Venice’s high water, or “acqua alta”, said to be the sixth highest since 1872, flooded 70% of the city and was high enough to make raised wooden platforms for pedestrians float away. The record high water in Venice – 1.94 metres in 1966 – prompted many residents to abandon the city for new lives on the mainland.

I’ve been to Venice, not when it was flooded. What I remember most were the canals, the gelato, and the quiet. Without cars, trucks, and scooters it’s a very quiet city. I’d love to go back.

Be sure to check out the Guardian’s photo gallery of the flood.

[Photograph: Luigi Costantini/AP]

Now, the Good News: Something very cool and unique comes to my little corner of the world: the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum. It officially opened this weekend.

Perhaps, it wasn’t a day for thinking small. In remarks earlier that morning, Eli Broad, the billionaire philanthropist and Michigan State University alumnus whose donations, ultimately totaling more than $28 million, had given the project life, said the museum “has the potential to do for Michigan State University and East Lansing what Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim did for Bilbao, Spain.”

I’m hoping to get over there soon, sometime this week. We’ve been watching the construction the past year or so. Our kids are actually very curious about the building. It does not look like anything else in the entire state of Michigan.

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2 thoughts on “Manic Monday

  1. I wonder what happen to San Marco’s square!!!?

    • I can’t get over the water. It’s very bad. Between the rising tides and the fact that Venice is a sinking city (much like New Orleans), make floods a problem that’s only getting worse.

      Yet, despite its centuries-long decay, Venice still fascinates. The book “City of Falling Angels” by John Berendt is an excellent look at the culture and people of the city.

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