Video Games and Ice Cream

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People have often remarked to my wife and me how well our kids do at traveling. I would like to think it’s because we’ve instilled in them the importance of being respectful, patient, kind, curious, and all that. But the fact is, kids (especially small kids like ours) don’t care even a tiny bit about history or culture.

Sure, they get to climb on old ruins like they did in Ephesus and Miletus, and climb down into an underground city in Cappadoccia. But for the most part, telling them that something is 1500 or 2000 years old briefly gets their attention and then it’s on to something else.

Still, the question is: how do we keep our kids from melting down and freaking out when we’re on a tour?

Bribery. Usually taking the forms of video games and ice cream.

There’s all kinds of parenting advice that appears to have been designed for children that were created under some impossibly ideal lab-like conditions where they do what they’re told and better behavior is merely a short timeout away. Or that getting them to try new foods is as simple as gentle prodding or the tried and true take-it-or-leave-it method.

These are not our kids.

Our kids are picky eaters. So picky that they skip lunch three or four times a week at their school; days when plain pasta (or rice in the case of my daughter) is not on the menu. They’re not allowed to bring their own lunch. Their only choice is what’s on the menu. Can you say “stubborn?” So when they arrive at home here around 4:30pm they’re tired and famished.

In Trabzon we managed to keep them alive on french fries, plain pasta, the small pancakes at the hotel’s breakfast buffet, ice cream, sour cherry juice, and American Children’s vitamins. Children’s vitamins in Turkey come in the form of syrup, which our kids will not drink. Gummies or Flintstone-style are not available here. We’ve had to buy vitamins through drugstore.com, ship them to family, who then bring them when they visit. We also bring along snacks on the trips: peanuts, dried mango, and almonds.

We recognize that if we can’t get the kids to appreciate even a sliver of what is important about something we’re seeing, they’re going to be bored. You can allow them to be bored for only so long before they take it out on you. Long bus rides from stop to stop, listening to a tour guide talk, is not an ideal way for a child to spend a day. So Henry plays his Nintendo 3DS and Meredith plays Minecraft or Where’s My Perry? on my wife’s iPad.

And thanks to these ever present ALGIDA ice cream bins in Turkey, we know that for the price of a few lira we can keep the kids happy for the time being. FYI, “mutluluğu paylaş” translates roughly as “Share your happiness.”

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2 thoughts on “Video Games and Ice Cream

  1. You have to be one step ahead of kids. I never figured out how to accomplish this task, but it looks like you have. I think its because you are a runner. 🙂

    • Ha! I think my wife and I have gotten better at it as we’ve continued to drag our kids with us wherever we go. But there are days/moments when we question our sanity.

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